Fast-growing groundnuts keep Ghana’s farmers afloat amid climate shifts

Early-maturing groundnut varieties are helping farmers in Ghana adapt to a shorter and more unpredictable rainy season, but improved seed is not always so easy to come by. Photo: C. Peterson (CCAFS/CIAT)

Early-maturing groundnut varieties are helping farmers in Ghana adapt to a shorter and more unpredictable rainy season, but improved seed is not always so easy to come by. Photo: C. Peterson (CCAFS/CIAT)  

It’s Ghana at the end of the dry season, and only one sound fills the air: the crunching, cracking sound of groundnuts being shelled. Domogyelle Naalubaar and his family – every one of them, from grandma down to the toddlers – are employed in the interminable business, methodically splitting the dusty shells, parting the two halves, and munching on the result as they go.

As they sit in the shade of a neem tree, the pile of meaty kernels and empty husks grows slowly at their feet. It’s easy to work out that groundnuts are a staple crop in Naalubaar’s household – and the households of most Ghanaian farmers for that matter.

To read the full post by Caity Peterson go to The Reuters Foundation blog.

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