Vegetables for Ghana’s vulnerable

Members of Dazuuri village’s blind and disabled group in Ghana have improved their ability to adapt to climate change impacts through a communal dry-season garden. Photo: C. Peterson (CIAT/CCAFS)

Members of Dazuuri village’s blind and disabled group in Ghana have improved their ability to adapt to climate change impacts through a communal dry-season garden. Photo: C. Peterson (CIAT/CCAFS)

Kur-Yang Maasofaa is a business man. He’s keen on detail but keeps to the facts, and he speaks English with the slow, dry precision of someone who values his education in a district where more than 70 percent of adults cannot read or write.

He keeps meticulous notes at every community meeting, and the power of the pen he wields makes him a respected character in the community. He’s also elderly, disabled by a badly arthritic knee, and walks with a cane that he props on the frame of his orange flame-colored bicycle to zoom around Dazuuri village in Ghana’s Upper West region.

When subsistence depends on your ability to toil in the fields or travel long distances to market, the elderly and people with disabilities are among those most vulnerable to the threat of food insecurity. The risks are heightened by the impacts of a changing and increasingly variable climate. But if anyone could have figured out a way to confront these challenges, it was bound to be Kur-Yang, armed with his trusty notebook.

To read the full article by Caity Peterson, visit the Thomson Reuters Foundation website.

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