“Soil power” a priority for Ghanaian farmers

Clement Naazuin, a farmer in Lawra, Ghana, explained to researchers the methods he's adopted to combat a shortened rainy season and decreased soil fertility, May 2013.

Clement Naazuin, a farmer in Lawra, Ghana, explained to researchers the methods he’s adopted to combat a shortened rainy season and decreased soil fertility, May 2013.

Sticks, manure, ridges, pits – we’re not talking rocket science, but the business of soil quality is a serious one in Lawra district in Ghana’s Upper West region.

Virtually every task Clement Naazuin considers to be important on his farm in Dazuuri village has to do with improving his soil.

In Ghana – a country with one of the most seriously nutrient-deficient soils in sub-Saharan Africa and even the world – soil degradation is perhaps the greatest limitation on improved agricultural productivity. The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) is taking a look at what farmers in Ghana can, and are doing to confront such challenges in a climate-smart manner, and what obstacles might be standing in their way.

For the full story by Caity Peterson, visit the Thomson Reuters Foundation blog.

Photo: C. Peterson (CIAT/CCAFS)

 

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